Georgia's Online Cancer Information Center

Featured Survivor: Tom Willner

Everyone has a different way of dealing with life’s difficulties. For Tom Willner, whose avocation is music and songwriting, it was a musical. As he was facing surgery for testicular cancer, he funneled his energies into developing the characters and song titles, and ultimately the words and music for “Turning Thirty, the Musical.” The production reflects his own cancer journey: facing surgery and its potential impact on fertility.

Read Tom Willner's Story Read more Survivors' Stories

Downloadable Survivorship Information

Click on each image to download and print these brochures. For additional information, click here.

Spiritual Issues in Survivorship

Why did cancer happen to me?
Confronting spiritual and faith issues after treatment

Emotional Issues in Survivorship

Why can't I shake this feeling?
Dealing with emotional issues after cancer treatment

Practical Matters in Survivorship

How am I going to manage everything?
Handling practical matters after cancer treatment

Physical Issues in Survivorship

When will I feel better?
Dealing with physical problems after cancer treatment

The words of Georgia’s cancer survivors reveal: Their hardship doesn’t end with their treatment.

They’ve been fortunate, yes. But their journey is far from over…

An individual is considered a cancer survivor from the time of diagnosis, through the balance of his or her life, and our state alone is home to nearly 447,000 survivors. Georgia CORE conducted a survey of more than 800 of these survivors -- the first statewide cancer needs assessment survey conducted in Georgia -- that revealed a wide range of struggles that can be best grouped as…

Physical: A lasting toll from chemotherapy, radiation and other treatments, chronic pain
Practical: Mounting debt and difficulty resuming work and responsibilities
Emotional: Depression and a powerful fear of cancer returning
Spiritual: Loss of faith or hope, even end-of-life thoughts

The medical community has begun paying more attention to these struggles and needs. “Cancer treatment” has evolved to provide care for the whole person, for the rest of his or her life. That’s why Georgia CORE includes a focus on survivorship in its work and has developed brochures that identify resources to meet these unmet needs. Click on each category above to download a brochure specific to that grouping of needs.

Just in time for the holidays, Georgia CORE partnered with Georgia Public Broadcast to get out the word about our new survivorship materials (linked above). Listen to the spot here.

Georgia CORE has been at the forefront of helping Georgia’s cancer survivors.

We’ve done this through research…

  • Surveyed Georgia hospitals (twice) to assess how they served survivors
  • Surveyed survivors (twice) to evaluate their needs and how well those needs are being met. One focused on disparate populations with translations in Spanish, Korean, Chinese and Vietnamese
  • Analyzed feedback from survivors on a pilot intervention program, in partnership with the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (Learn more about our PCORI grant here.)

…and education

  • Held “Best and Promising Practices” conference for healthcare providers and administrators
  • Convened clinicians, practitioners and others for a second conference, “Survivorship: Up Close and Personal”
  • Provided follow-up materials to wider group of stakeholders
  • Published article on survivorship in Journal of Georgia Public Health Association

…and communication.

  • Launched the Cancer Survivorship Connection, a major initiative that provides Georgia’s survivors with resources and tools to improve their quality of life
  • Started a pilot program (in partnership with Pfizer) for survivors of prostate cancer, providing videos, articles and an app “Living With” to track symptoms and future care
  • Designed and developed a telephone intervention (CORE:ReCHARGE) to improve survivorship care and outcomes  

Now, we must do more to help them.

Georgians are beating cancer more than ever, thanks to advances in research and treatments. That’s great news. But so many Georgians who have battled cancer continue to suffer. They need help in life beyond treatment. Past success shows our state has the infrastructure to provide this help. We also have a plan – the Cancer Survivorship Strategic Plan. By putting this plan to work, Georgia can address the real needs of its cancer survivors. We can also become a national leader in an emerging area of care. If you’d like to get involved with the Georgia Survivor Advocacy Council, contact Georgia CORE at 404.523.8735. Or email us.

 

 

(Click image to read our most recent publication on survivorship.)

Guest Editorial: A three-time cancer survivor should not get COVID-19, but I did

Cancer patients and survivors should not get COVID-19. A three-time cancer survivor should definitely not get COVID. But I did. And it was not good. Here is my story and the lessons I learned that might be of value to others.

1/19/2021

Survivors helping others survive

Three women, three cancer survivorship journeys, three missions resulting in nonprofits started to help and support others fighting cancer.

11/03/2020

Despite pandemic, Georgia’s Colorectal Cancer Control Program making significant strides

Thanks to funding awarded by the Centers for Disease Control for five-years beginning July 2020, Georgia CORE and Augusta University are partners in the Georgia Colorectal Cancer Control Program, which is increasing CRC screenings in southeast and southwest Georgia.

3/23/2021

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Advancing Cancer Care through Partnerships and Innovation

Georgia CORE is a public-private partnership that creates collaboration among the state’s cancer organizations and institutions to connect more Georgians to quality, personalized cancer care. We welcome you to this one-of-a-kind online information center for all things related to cancer and survivorship care in Georgia.